THE NOISY BRIDGE
The present high level concrete span across Rocky River replaced in 1909 a rickety old iron bridge built at about the same spot and level.
Walter D. Coulter, whose drug store and restuarant at the east approach of the present bridge is one of the oldest and best known in Lakewood, recalls the racket made by farmers driving their wagons over the planks of the old structure - especially at night. The heavy farm wagons with their iron-rimmed wheels could be heard for blocks around.
Mr. Coulter and his brother, Edward, had established a confecionery and lunch near the entrance to the old bridge in 1907. When the present one was built two years later they were forced to move across the street to make way for it. Incidentally, the abuttments of the old span were not removed until the spring of 1936 when the PWA (Public Works Administration) got busy.
On March 2, 1936, the Coulters'' business was interrupted for a second time by an explosion. Gas, seeping into the basement from a leaky main, was touched off by sparks from an electric motor, it was thought. The place was remodeled and opened about the time this book was published (May 1936).
Excerpt from Story of Lakewood (Ohio) describing Coulters' Corner
THE NOISY BRIDGE The present high level concrete span across Rocky River replaced in 1909 a rickety old iron bridge built at about the same spot and level. Walter D. Coulter, whose drug store and restuarant at the east approach of the present bridge is one of the oldest and best known in Lakewood, recalls the racket made by farmers driving their wagons over the planks of the old structure - especially at night. The heavy farm wagons with their iron-rimmed wheels could be heard for blocks around. Mr. Coulter and his brother, Edward, had established a confecionery and lunch near the entrance to the old bridge in 1907. When the present one was built two years later they were forced to move across the street to make way for it. Incidentally, the abuttments of the old span were not removed until the spring of 1936 when the PWA (Public Works Administration) got busy. On March 2, 1936, the Coulters'' business was interrupted for a second time by an explosion. Gas, seeping into the basement from a leaky main, was touched off by sparks from an electric motor, it was thought. The place was remodeled and opened about the time this book was published (May 1936).

Date posted: 2015-09-25 20:25:01

Tagged: Coulter's Corner