Civil War Letters

These pages contain five letters a relative of mine wrote during and immediately after the Civil War. The author of the letters is Francis Pettibone of the 105th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He entered the service Aug. 5, 1862, at age 18 for a three-year tour of duty. The recipient of four of the letters is his uncle, C.A. Pettibone of Girard, Pennsylvania (near Erie).

Overview

Co. G of the105th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry was mustered in Aug. 20, 1862, at Camp Taylor in Cleveland, Ohio, by J.R. Paxton, Captain 15th Infantry. It was mustered out June 3, 1865, near Washington D.C. by Jacob Kline, Captain 16th Infantry.

The 105th was part of the 2nd Brigade of the 3rd Division of the 14th Army Corps, part of the Army of the Cumberland under Major Gen. William S. Rosecrans. Brig. Gen. John M. Brannan commanded the 3rd Division. Col. John T. Croxton commanded the 2nd Brigade until he was wounded and replaced by Col. William H. Hays.

The 105th was involved in the battle of Perryville, Ky., in October 1862. Many of the soldiers in Co. G were killed or injured at Murfreesboro between Feb. and June 1863. One person from the company was captured and another injured at Chickamauga in Sept. 1863; another was killed at Mission Ridge, Tenn., in Nov. 1863; a few were killed in Georgia in 1864.

More information on the 105th is available at the following sites:

One Hundred and Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 1013 men, Albert S. Hall colonel, mustered in at Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, August 20-21, 1862; served in the defense of Kentucky at Perryville during Bragg's invasion in 1862; in October ordered into Tennessee; in January, 1863, assigned to the Fourth Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. In active service in Tennessee through 1863 at Chickamauga and Mission Ridge; took part in Sherman's great campaign through Georgia in 1864; in the campaign of the Carolinas in the opening months of 1865; reviewed at Washington May 24th, and there mustered out June 3, 1865, 427 men, Lieutenant Colonel George T. Perkins commanding.